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Hours: Monday - Thursday 9:30 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday 1 - 5 p.m. (November - April)
 

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Equanimity
Andrew Reardon

October 19 – December 2, 2018

Opening Reception:
Friday, October 19, 5:30 p.m.

Reardon created a 30 minute looped documentary film illustrating his journey from Hartford, CT to Marpha, Nepal as a part of an artist residency. He also shows photographic images of daily life in Nepal.

His work explores the interchangeability of both time and change through the capturing and manipulation of light and sound. He says, "every moment we experience is always an improvisation with what has existed, exists now, and will potentially exist. In order for us as individuals and communities to grow we must introduce ourselves to new environments, both landscapes and cultures, to allow ourselves the opportunity to understand and learn from deep complexity our universe has to offer." He took this journey of growth as he stayed in Marpha, Nepal as part of an artist residency. This work is an expression of that exploration.

Urban Legends of Modern Archaeology
Rashmi Talpade

January 11 – February 24, 2019

Opening Reception:
Friday, January 11, 5:30 p.m.

“Urban Legends of Modern Archaeology” follows the urban legends of industrial relics and abandoned factories as they merge with nature’s relentless march across manmade waste and environmental abuse. It reflects our world in normal day-to-day photographs of seemingly ordinary objects, where our not so recent past collides and merges with our constantly changing environment today.  Modern Archaeology is a narrative of our previous and current successes that, while coexisting together, differ in many different ways.  One time icons of success, large manufacturing facilities, which have fallen into disrepair are just a few miles away from modern office buildings in suburban business parks.  While the environmentally friendly highly automated office complexes seek to preserve our planet, the factories of the past ignored the environment but provided jobs and livelihoods to ordinary people.  These different ideas indicate changing times, shifting dynamics and complex issues which we as a country have to deal with in the future.

40 Years of the CPA Prison Arts Program
Community Partners in Action

March 15 - April 28, 2019

Opening Reception:
Friday, March 15, 5:30 p.m.

40 Years of the CPA Prison Arts Program is comprised of drawings, paintings, sculptures, photographs, documents and artifacts from the CPA’s Permanent Collection that vividly illustrate the work and history of this important project.

For the past four decades, the Prison Arts Program has advocated for art and artists in prison, organized in-prison workshops and an annual show open to anyone incarcerated in Connecticut, maintained a travelling permanent collection, published and distributed a journal of art and writing, and collaborated with other organizations, agencies and individuals. The program works to positively and constructively change the prison environment while encouraging empathy, self discipline, work ethic, self esteem, technical and communication skill development, thoughtfulness, critical thinking and calm. 


George Gould, Dream Lover Entrapped, colored pencil on paper, 1994

Beyond Surface
Brian McClear

May 17 - June 29, 2019

Opening Reception:
Friday, May 17, 5:30 p.m.

Beyond Surface presents a sampling from two concurrent projects which challenge the viewer to look beyond the surface, whether considering everyday objects or the people they meet.

"Discards & Discovery" is a series of oil paintings inspired by found objects, where seemingly unrelated objects are paired together to emphasize an unexpected commonality or imply an underlying meaning.

"Ink & Oil" is a series of portraits that explore people of all ages and walks of life that have chosen tattoos as their form of self-expression. These portraits seek to capture a gesture and mood that provide additional insights into the subject’s personality beyond their art. Simply put, they are canvases of people who are themselves canvases.